The courses offered by the University are listed below in alphabetical order by discipline or field of study, except as otherwise noted, and in numerical order under the discipline or field of study. Following the title of each course are numbers representing lecture, laboratory, clinical experience, and credit respectively, the requirements for admission to the course, if any, and a brief description of its content.

For more information on these course descriptions, see About Course Descriptions.

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is not sufficient enrollment to warrant its offering.


THL 437 Biblical Prophecy I: Major Prophets

Description: 

This course deals with the role and function of biblical or “major” prophets with a focus on the prophecies found in Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel. Emphasis is on the historical background of each prophet and the writing of each book as well as their prophetic meaning. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

 

THL 438 - Biblical Prophecy II: Minor Prophets

Description: 

This course focuses on the writings of the minor prophets, including the background, message, purposes and theme of each. Emphasis is upon the essential message and teaching of each book, shaped by the relationship of the individual prophets with the God of Israel, together with their personality and background. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

THL 439 Biblical Prophecy III: Daniel and Revelation

Description: 

This course deals with the Old Testament prophecies that blend into New Testament prophecies, especially Daniel with the Olivet Prophecy and the book of Revelation including their correspondence with Ezekiel's and Zechariah's prophecies. Emphasis is on the biblical teaching of the "last things." Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

THL 440ab Homiletics

Description: 

This two semester course is an introduction to preaching. Emphasis is on preparation and delivery of sermonettes, the purpose and presentation of the song service, and place of sermonettes within the church service. Upon completion, students should be able to deliver sermonettes and lead the song service in a local congregation.

THL 445ab Advanced Homiletics

Description: 

This two-semester course prepares the student for the tasks and responsibilities of preaching including the application of the principles of hermeneutics. Emphasis is on sermon preparation and practice in preaching. Upon completion, students should be able to deliver sermons and plan a speaking schedule for a local congregation.

THL 450 Introduction to Biblical Theology

Description: 

This course deals with the principal doctrines of Christianity as seen through various theological systems and interpretations. Topics include the nature of God; biblical and theological development of concepts regarding the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit; the creation and the purpose for mankind; and covenants, salvation, grace, law, faith and the Church. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate systematic approach to fundamental doctrinal understanding. This is the capstone course for the baccalaureate degree theology major.

THL 460 Understanding Contemporary World Religions

Description: 

This course is an introduction to the major religious traditions of the world, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam; and consideration of neo-pagan and cultic phenomena in the contemporary world. Emphasis is on the historical development, key figures, as well as major doctrines and practices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the similarities and differences between the world’s religions and how they differ from Christianity.

THL 467 Historical Geography of the Bible Lands

Description: 

This course deals with the historical geography of the Bible Lands as represented in ancient texts (the Bible as well as Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Canaanite sources). Emphasis is on the interrelationship of history with physical and human geography during the Bronze and Iron Ages including analysis of the settlement, economic, political, military, and communication factors in ancient Israel. Upon completion a student should be able to correlate relevant archaeological, historical and biblical material with important sites, roads, and landscape features within the eastern Mediterranean region.

THL 473 Archaeology and the Old Testament

Description: 

This course deals with the archaeology of the Bible Lands from the fourth millennium BCE through the intertestamental period. Topics addressed include patriarchal Palestine, Joseph and Moses in Egypt, the reigns of David and Solomon, the divided kingdom, the exile, and the intertestamental period. Upon completion, students should be able to explain how understanding of the social, political and religious background of the biblical world aids illumination of the Hebrew Scriptures.

THL 499abc Independent Study

Description: 

In this course a student selects a project in consultation with a faculty sponsor before registration and completes it over the course of a semester. Progress meetings are held regularly and the student must submit a formal final report. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate mastery in the content of the project orally and in writing.

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