The courses offered by the University are listed below in alphabetical order by discipline or field of study, except as otherwise noted, and in numerical order under the discipline or field of study. Following the title of each course are numbers representing lecture, laboratory, clinical experience, and credit respectively, the requirements for admission to the course, if any, and a brief description of its content.

For more information on these course descriptions, see About Course Descriptions.

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is not sufficient enrollment to warrant its offering.


THL 215 The Lost Tribes of Israel in History and Prophecy

Description: 

This course examines what is known about the Israelite people from the Bible and other historical sources. Emphasis is on the diaspora of the Ten Tribes after the fall of the Kingdom of Israel in 721 BCE, the material culture documenting their migrations, and the historical sources detailing their unique contribution to the development of the contemporary world. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the biblical keys and identify and explain the material culture and historical resources that enable the identification of the lost ten tribes of Israel, the tracing of their migrations, and their place in biblical prophecy.

THL 300 Introduction to Biblical Languages and Resources

Description: 

This course is a basic introduction to Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic using Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek resources in e-Sword and TheWord. Emphasis is on the original languages with more attention to Greek, the alphabets of both languages, the nuances of grammar in relation to understanding the text, and the use of major tools for original language study. Upon completion, students should be able to employ the original language tools found in software programs profitably and responsibly in using the Hebrew Bible and the Greek New Testament to prepare articles, sermons and Bible studies, and demonstrate the proper use of an interlinear text in understanding the meaning of biblical text.

THL 320 Introduction to Church History

Description: 

This course traces the history of the Church of God from apostolic times to the present day. Topics include significant events in the life of the Church and its theology through each of its seven distinct eras. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze significant developments in the history and theology of the Church.

THL 326 Christian Service and Leadership

Description: 

This course deals with the theory and practice of servant leadership in the setting of the Christian family, the church congregation and the community. Topics include leadership foundations, skills, and issues. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic principles and practices of servant leadership and display the qualities of a servant leader in a congregational setting.

THL 332 The Biblical Text

Description: 

This course deals with the authority, inspiration, canonization, literary unity, and textual criticism of the biblical text. Emphasis is on Bible translations, versions, textual analysis, exegesis, and research. Upon completion, students should be able to generate an evidence-based explanation of the formation of the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament and demonstrate the fundamentals of interpretation and textual research.

THL 342 Christian Marriage and Family

Description: 

This course provides a biblical perspective and an overview of research as it relates to marriage and family relationships. Selected topics include preparation for marriage, qualities for home and family life, the adolescent and young married adult, family management, and contemporary problems in marriage and family life. Upon completion, students should be able to describe biblical principles for marriage and family, to explain examined theories related to marriage and family, to summarize factors involved in mate selection and readiness for marriage, and to articulate principles of establishing and maintaining healthy family relationships.

THL 344 Christian Women

Description: 

This course attends to the unique role in life that a Christian woman fills with special emphasis on qualities relevant to the life and work of the Christian woman in the church. Selected topics include the lives and examples of outstanding women of the Bible and the mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual issues affecting all Christian women and the practical, biblical methods of dealing with them. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate and explain the principles relevant to the life, work, and success of the Christian woman.

THL 345 Christian Men

Description: 

This course deals with Christian men as husbands, fathers and masculine leaders of the family. Topics include the purpose God has given men, being a loving leader and head of a family and key areas in which Christian men are challenged to mature and excel. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate and explain the principles relevant to the life, work, and success of the Christian man.

THL 350 Principles of Counseling and Conflict Resolution

Description: 

This course focuses on the philosophy and techniques of biblically-based counseling including interpersonal, premarital, marital, family counseling, addiction counseling, and biblical conflict resolution. Topics include the nature and principles of biblically-based counseling; techniques and theories of counseling; patterns of problem solving; the counselor and counselee relationship; the applicability of Scripture; and biblical conflict resolution. Upon completion a student should be able to understand and discuss multiple issues applicable to counseling and demonstrate the basic techniques of biblically-based counseling.

THL 380 Introduction to Biblical Doctrine

Description: 

This course deals with basic biblical doctrine. Topics include the Church, the Holy Bible, God, the Holy Spirit, the gospel, salvation, holy days and festivals, the law of God, the Sabbath, sin, being born again, church government, marriage, the second coming of Christ, the last judgment, and human potential. Upon completion, students should be able to state and demonstrate fundamental understanding of basic biblical doctrine. Tomorrow’s World television presenter Richard Ames presents a series of lectures on foundational biblical doctrines. 

THL 394 Senior Thesis

Description: 

This is a special course for developing a thesis written on a work (or works) selected in conference with the thesis sponsor. In this course a student selects a thesis topic in consultation with a faculty sponsor before registration and completes it over the course of a semester. Progress meetings are held regularly and the student must submit a formal final approved thesis. Upon completion, the student can demonstrate mastery in the content of the thesis orally and in writing.

THL 399 Undergraduate Open Seminar

Description: 

This is a special topics course for reading and conference or for experimentation, or a seminar on topics not treated by regularly scheduled classes. Upon completion, the student is able to demonstrate mastery of the content of the readings or topics of the seminar. A maximum of three hours of credit may be earned toward the bachelor’s degree in Undergraduate Open Seminar in theology.

THL 412 Epistles of Paul I

Description: 

This is the first of two courses focusing on the Apostle Paul’s life and writings. Its emphasis is on the first four of his letters to the seven churches (Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians and Galatians) and includes a study of the background, message, purposes and themes of each. Stress is upon the use of critical, historical, archaeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

 

THL 413 Epistles of Paul II

Description: 

This is the second course focusing on the Apostle Paul’s life and writings. Emphasis is on the final five of his letters to the seven churches (Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and 1 & 2 Thessalonians), his letter to the church at-large (Hebrews) and his letters addressed to individuals (1 & 2 Timothy, Titus and Philemon). Stress is upon the use of critical, historical, archaeological and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

THL 416 General Epistles and Revelation

Description: 

This course introduces the historical setting, purpose, and central theme of the letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude and the book of Revelation. Emphasis is on the use of critical, historical, archaeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, explain, and expound on these biblical writings.

THL 421 History of Christianity I

Description: 

This course deals with the history of Christianity from the first century to the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation. Focus is on the growth and development of Christianity during the early centuries in the Mediterranean World as well as its expansion into Europe and the East. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of major events, movements, and theological trends from the first century to the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation.

THL 422 History of Christianity II

Description: 

This course deals with the history of Christianity from the time of the Reformation to the present. It focuses on the Protestant Reformation, Roman Catholic reform, Protestant liberalism and fundamentalism, the ecumenical movement, Christianity in developing countries, and the Christian decline of the industrialized West. Noted are basic theological developments in these systems and the social, political, and economic forces influencing them. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the modern history of Christianity as a global religion and to show the diversity of its beliefs and practices.

THL 428 Working with Elderly in the Church

Description: 

This course deals with identifying the needs, both physical and spiritual, of the elderly. Emphasis is on learning and applying necessary care skills to meet these needs and developing an awareness of available community resources. Upon completion, students should be sensitive to and proactive in dealing with the challenges and needs of an aging population, e.g., spiritual/religious, social, biological, physiological, and psychological.

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