The courses offered by the University are listed below in alphabetical order by discipline or field of study, except as otherwise noted, and in numerical order under the discipline or field of study. Following the title of each course are numbers representing lecture, laboratory, clinical experience, and credit respectively, the requirements for admission to the course, if any, and a brief description of its content.

For more information on these course descriptions, see About Course Descriptions.

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is not sufficient enrollment to warrant its offering.


HIST 111 History of Western Civilization to 1648

Description: 

This course, the first course in a series of two, deals with Western civilization from pre-history to the late seventeenth century. Emphasis on the ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome, Middle Ages, the Papacy, Renaissance and Reformation, early nation states and the Thirty Years’ War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early Western civilization.

HIST 112 History of Western Civilization Since 1660

Description: 

This course, the second in a series of two, deals with the social, political, economic and technological developments of Europe from the late seventeenth century to the present day. Emphasis on the industrial revolution, American and French Revolutions, liberalism and democracy, nationalism, imperialism, the World Wars and the post-World War II era. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern western civilization.

HPRO 114 Health and Wellness

Description: 

This course aims to filter the vast array of health-related knowledge available in the world today through sound biblical principles. Emphasis is placed on lifestyle-related wellness, health promotion, and disease prevention within the context of a range of health topics. Upon completion students should be able to demonstrate a cursory understanding of and basic skill set related to: healthy decision-making, consumer health education, healthy weight management, and other skills which will enable them to make health-enhancing choices and engage in health-enhancing activities to improve their quality of life.

IRG 301 Introduction to International Relations and Global Studies

Description: 

This course is an introduction to the areas related to international relations and global studies through the description and analysis of forces and events on-going in the world. Topics include contemporary problems and biblical perspectives, development, nationalism, revolution, war and peace, and imperialism as they relate to overall patterns in international affairs. Upon completion, students should be able to  discuss the issues that concern international relations today and how they shape the future and the foreign policy decisions of nation states.

MATH 162 Finite Mathematics

Description: 

This course provides an introduction in a non-technical setting to selected topics in mathematics. Topics may include, but are not limited to, sets, logic, probability, statistics, matrices, mathematical systems, geometry, topology, mathematics of finance, and modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to understand a variety of mathematical applications, think logically, and be able to work collaboratively and independently.

MATH 168 Statistical Analysis

Description: 

This course deals with basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and decision making. Emphasis is on frequency distributions, probability distributions, random variables, expectation, sampling, estimation and decision making. Upon completion, students should be able to describe data and test inferences about populations using sample data.

MATH 172 Precalculus Algebra

Description: 

This is the first of two courses designed to emphasize topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on equations and inequalities, functions (linear, polynomial, rational), systems of equations and inequalities, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis and predictions.

MATH 174 Precalculus Trigonometry

Description: 

This is the second of two courses designed to emphasize topics which are prerequsite to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on properties and applications of transcendental functions and their graphs, right and oblique triangle trigonometry, conic sections, vectors, and polar coordinates. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis and prediction.

 

MUS 121 Music History and Appreciation

Description: 

This course provides students with an introduction to the discipline of music through listening, discussion, and analysis. Emphasis is on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music.

MUS 348 Song Leading and Church Music

Description: 

This course deals with the techniques of directing songs in congregational singing, choir rehearsal and performance. Practice includes conducting beat patterns, cues and learning elementary rehearsal techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to show knowledge of the fundamentals of directing songs, to gather information necessary for performing song leading and some choir directing duties, and to demonstrate knowledge appropriate for congregational song leading.

NUTR 207 Introductory Nutrition

Description: 

This is a basic nutrition course with emphasis on nutrients and their relationship to the human body, including human nutritional requirements and nutritive values of various foods. Key issues include dietary standards for diet adequacy and healthy eating for prevention of chronic diseases. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the components of a healthy diet and evaluate his or her own diet.

PHED 236 Christian Camp Leadership

Description: 

This course is designed to prepare students for service as Christian camp counselors or activity leaders. Emphasisis is on techniques of Christian camp counseling and leadership, camp safety, activities and program development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the various philosophies, administration, and programming of Christian camps, and serve in the capacity of a Christian camp counselor or activity leader.

THL 110A Tomorrow's World Bible Study Course

Description: 

This two semester course serves an introduction to the Bible, its message, and its implication for successful Christian living. First semester topics focus on the Scriptures, the nature of God, biblical prophecy and God's plan for humankind. Second semester topics focus on practical Christian living and the building of living faith. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of biblical concepts regarding history, theology, prophecy and Christian life.

THL 110B Tomorrow's World Bible Study Course

Description: 

This two semester course serves as an introduction to the Bible, its message, and its implication for successful Christian living. First semester topics focus on the Scriptures, the nature of God, biblical prophecy and God's plan for humankind. Second semester topics focus on practical Christian living and the building of living faith. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of biblical concepts regarding history, theology, prophecy and Christian life.

THL 135 Life, Ministry and Teachings of Jesus

Description: 

This course covers the life, ministry, and teachings of Jesus Christ as presented in the four gospels. Emphasis is on the analysis of the four gospels in the context of the social, political, and religious conditions of the first century. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the background, purpose, message, and themes of the gospels and the significance of Jesus Christ in the first century and beyond. The lecture core of this course is a series of recorded lectures presented by noted television evangelist, author, and pastor of pastors Dr. Roderick C. Meredith.

THL 136 Acts and the Writings of Paul

Description: 

Focused in the book of Acts of the Apostles this course deals with Paul’s life, times and writings, including the background, purpose, message and themes of the Pauline epistles; his personal life and character; his companions; and the chronology of the apostle’s life. Emphasis is on the theology of his writings and the issues that Paul dealt with in the apostolic church. On completion, students should be able to show the message of Acts and each of the Pauline Epistles and their implication and application.

THL 200 Principles of Christian Living

Description: 

This covers the purpose for human life; human nature; values, morality, and ethics; marriage and family, and career. Topics include values, beliefs, and mores; interpersonal communication, dating, courtship, marriage, and children. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and demonstrate a basic knowledge of practical Christian living. The lecture core is a set of contemporary lectures by Dr. Douglas Winnail dealing with the foundations of Christian living for successful life in today's world.

THL 211 Old Testament Survey I

Description: 

This course is an introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures following the order set out in the Tanakh. The course focuses upon the Torah, the Former Prophets (historical books) and the Major Prophets (Isaiah–Ezekiel). Emphasis is upon the background, content, structure, geography, teachings, and basic meaning of each book as well as outstanding people and events. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the author, background, theme, and content of each book.

THL 212 Old Testament Survey II

Description: 

This course deals with the Minor Prophets and The Writings. Emphasis is upon the background, content, structure, geography, teachings and basic meaning of each book and outstanding people and events as background and foundation for understanding the New Testament. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the author, background, theme, and content of each book.

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