General Education

General education courses prepare students for lifelong learning by providing them with the understanding, appreciation and skills that will assist them in living more useful, happy and productive lives; facilitating a values-based foundation for Christian living, leadership and service; and fostering competence in evaluating information and constructing knowledge in multiple ways. Fundamental to all these skill sets is the ability to think critically.

The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Theology degree programs require a minimum of 40 semester credit hours in general education coursework. The Associate of Theology degree program requires a minimum of 36 semester credit hours in general education courses. Diploma programs include 12 semester credit hours of general education courses (COMM 150, ENGL 111 and 112, HPRO 114).

For additional information about the General Education Requirements for a specific diploma or degree through the following links:

Objectives, Competencies and Required Courses

The basic general education requirement for a baccalaureate consists of a minimum of 40 semester credit hours in general education core courses as set forth below. See the A.Th. degree and the B.Th. degree programs for the general education requirement in these programs.

Critical Thinking

Objective

Across all disciplines students shall demonstrate the ability to think critically and constructively.

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to:

  • Identify and summarize the problem or question at issue (and/or the source’s position);
  • Identify and present the student’s own hypothesis, perspective and position as it is important to the analysis of the issue;
  • Identify and consider other salient perspectives and positions that are important to the analysis;
  • Identify and assess the key assumptions;
  • Identify and assess the quality of supporting data/evidence and provide additional data/evidence related to the issue;
  • Identify and consider the influence of the context on the issue; and
  • Identify and assess conclusions, implications and consequences.

Communication

Objective

Students shall demonstrate the ability to communicate clearly through the media of spoken and written English.

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  • Understand and use basic research techniques;

  • Locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources;

  • Do assigned readings and demonstrates an understanding of their written and/or quantitative content;

  • Demonstrate the ability to summarize, paraphrase, and question using standard written English;

  • Locate appropriate information using an assortment of media, including books, magazines, journals, newspapers, and electronic sources;

  • Write using standard English, clear, well-organized argumentative essays and research papers, that utilize primary and secondary sources;

  • Properly cite sources using MLA style;

  • Make clear, well-organized oral presentations; and

  • Evaluate oral presentations according to established criteria.

Required Courses

Students must satisfactorily complete:

COMM 260 Public Speaking (3 SCH)

ENGL 111 Written Expression (3 SCH)

ENGL 112 Argument-Based Literary Research (3 SCH)

Health and Physical Education

Objective

Students shall demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of life span wellness and fitness activities, and on the knowledge, attitudes, habits, and skills needed to live well.

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  • Identify and evaluate risk factors and behaviors associated with health, disease, and optimal well-being;
  • Identify, analyze, and evaluate the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual factors that influence health behavior and wellbeing;
  • Develop theory-based intervention strategies and techniques to effectively influence health behavior change;
  • Identify various psychosocial factors, e.g., self-esteem, locus of control, self-efficacy, health beliefs, cultural values, and the like, that play a role in the behavior change process and utilize them in individual and group program planning;
  • Identify and promote the use of self-management skills that lead to lifelong adherence to healthy lifestyles;
  • Demonstrate the use of various motivational (incentive, compliance, and adherence) techniques in the design of individual and group program planning and delivery; and
  • Identify, analyze, and utilize the sociocultural forces that shape personal and group viewpoints regarding fitness, physical activity, health, and wellness; and
  • Identify and analyze the impact of social determinants of physical activity, health and well-being in individual and group program planning and promotion.

Required Courses

Approved transfer credit of four semester credit hours of physical education activity courses may substitute for HPRO 114.

Students must satisfactorily complete:

HPRO 114 Health and Wellness (3 SCH)

Humanities and Fine Arts

Objective

Students shall gain a perspective of the cultural heritage of western civilization.

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the range of values, beliefs and ideas embodied in the human experience;
  • Demonstrate an understanding and interpret basic concepts and theories of the humanities and arts;
  • Demonstrate creative sensitivity and esthetic understanding; and
  • Demonstrate an understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

Required Courses

Approved transfer credit in a two semester sequence in American literature, British literature or literature of the western world may substitute for ENGL 261 and 262.

Students must satisfactorily complete either:

ART 110 Art History and Appreciation (3 SCH) or
MUS 121 Music History and Appreciation (3 SCH)

and both

ENGL 261 World Literature I (3 SCH)
ENGL 262 World Literature II (3 SCH)

Information Technology

Objective

Students shall demonstrate basic proficiency in the use of computers.

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  • Describe the role of the computer within our technological society;
  • Identify the basic hardware components of a computer and state the purpose of each;
  • Explain the purpose of application and system software and identify examples of each;
  • Explain the Internet and World Wide Web including concepts and components;
  • Discuss computer communication concepts including wired and wireless networks;
  • Identify privacy and security issues associated with computer usage and state ways to reduce risk;
  • Discuss the pros and cons of societal and ethical issues involved in future technological developments; and
  • Demonstrate proficiency in using productivity software including word processor, spread sheet and database applications.

Required Courses

Students must satisfactorily complete:

CIS 110 Introduction to Computers (3 SCH)

Natural and Mathematical Sciences

Objective

Students shall demonstrate a familiarity with the methods and applications of the natural sciences and mathematics and shall acquire basic knowledge and skills in these disciplines..

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation, evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis;
  • Demonstrate application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences;
  • Demonstrate the ability to interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics;
  • Demonstrate the ability to represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally;
  • Demonstrate the ability to employ quantitative methods such as, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems;
  • Demonstrate the ability to estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness; and
  • Demonstrate the ability to recognize the limits of mathematical and statistical methods.

Required Courses

Approved transfer credit in a college laboratory science such as but not limited to general chemistry, physics, or geology, may substitute for the sequence ANTH 230 and 230L. Approved transfer credit in more advanced mathematics meets the mathematics requirement.

Students must satisfactorily complete:

ANTH 230 Biological Anthropology (3 SCH)

ANTH 230L Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1 SCH)

and one of the following:

MATH 162 Finite Mathematics (3 SCH)
MATH 168 Statistical Analysis (3 SCH)
MATH 172 Precalculus Algebra (3 SCH)
MATH 174 Precalculus Trigonometry (3 SCH)

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Objective

Students shall acquire a general comprehension of broad topics and issues in the social and behavioral sciences.

Competencies

Students meeting this objective should be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, models and issues of at least one discipline in the social sciences;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, and the like, of Western civilization;
  • Relate the development of Western civilization to that of other regions of the world; and
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a broad outline of world history.

Required Courses

Approved transfer credit in introductory behavioral studies, geography, psychology, political science, or sociology may substitute for ANTH 220. The transfer of an approved two semester sequence in United States history or British history may substitute for HIST 111 and 112.

Students must satisfactorily complete

HIST 111 History of Western Civilization to 1648 (3 SCH)
and two of the following:
ANTH 220 Sociocultural Anthropology (3 SCH)
ECON 251 Principles of Microeconomics (3 SCH)
ECON 252 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 SCH)
HIST 112 History of Western Civilization Since 1648 (3 SCH)
IRG 301 Introduction to International Relations and Global Studies (3 SCH)