Courses
The courses offered by the University are listed below in alphabetical order by discipline or field of study, except as otherwise noted, and in numerical order under the discipline or field of study. Following the title of each course are numbers representing lecture, laboratory, clinical experience, and credit respectively, the requirements for admission to the course, if any, and a brief description of its content.

For more information on these course descriptions, see About Course Descriptions.

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is not sufficient enrollment to warrant its offering.


ACCT 251 Principles of Financial Accounting

Description: 

This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is upon on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations.

ACCT 252 Using Accounting Information

Description: 

This course introduces the use of accounting information to manage, measure, and improve the performance of a business enterprise or nonprofit corporation, and to make decisions about future operations. Emphasis is on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts including product-costing systems.

ANTH 220 Sociocultural Anthropology

Description: 

This course introduces the nature of human culture from a global perspective. Emphasis is on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, religion, and the cultural past to produce a holistic and global perspective of humanity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate enhanced global awareness including an understanding of basic cultural processes and the methodologies involved in the collection and analysis of cultural data. Pictured is a scene of the 19th century forced relocation of Native Americans from southeastern states.

ANTH 230 Biological Anthropology

Description: 

This course deals with the origins and biological diversity of humans. Emphasis is on human origins and early man; examination of origins perspectives; the primate paleontological record; human genetics and human variation and adaptation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the biological and cultural processes impacting the human species.

ANTH 230L Biological Anthropology Laboratory

Description: 

This course provides laboratory work that reinforces the material presented in ANTH 230. Emphasis is placed on laboratory exercises which may include fossil identification, genetic analysis, skeletal comparisons, forensics, computer simulations, and field observations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of human genetics, non-human primates, the human fossil record, and human variation.

ART 110 Art History and Appreciation

Description: 

This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical context, content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media.

Image is The Starry Night, an oil on canvas by the Dutch post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh. Painted in June 1889, it depicts the view from the east-facing window of his asylum room at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence,

BUS 308 Business Law

Description: 

This course deals with the American legal system, torts, contracts, agency, sales, property, negotiable instruments and business organizations. Special emphasis is on contemporary business ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations.

BUS 350 Organizational Theory and Behavior

Description: 

This course covers individual aspects of organizational behavior. Emphasis is on individual-organizational interface, organizational characteristics, organizational processes, and organization change and development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of organizational structures, implement adaptations for diverse organizational cultures, recognize and eliminate internal and external constraints, overcome organizational conflicts and plan successful change efforts.

CIS 110 Introduction to Computers

Description: 

This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems.

COMM 260 Public Speaking

Description: 

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

COMM 265 Advanced Public Speaking

Description: 

This course focuses on the theoretical principles of public speaking and provides advanced practical experience in the preparation, delivery, and evaluation of public discourse. Emphasis is performance-centered and includes presentations, selected readings, examinations and classroom exercises on a more advanced level. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches to a variety of audiences.

ECON 251 Principles of Microeconomics

Description: 

This course, the first course in a series of two, deals with microeconomic concepts and analysis. Emphasis is on analysis of the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives.

ECON 252 Principles of Macroeconomics

Description: 

This course, the second in a series of two, deals with basic macroeconomic concepts. Emphasis is on the analysis of the determination of prices and output in different market situations and public policy. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals.

EDUC 345 Early Childhood Education in the Church

Description: 

This course deals with the influence of Christian family relationships on child development. Emphasis is on basic principles and skills for parent effectiveness, the developing nature and needs of children, and how they learn. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and demonstrate knowledge of major areas of child growth and development and effective Christian parenting.

EDUC 346 Teaching in the Christian Home

Description: 

This course deals with the issues and challenges involved in organizing an effective Christian home school. Emphasis is on legal regulations; curriculum development; teaching Bible, literacy, science, mathematics, socialization, and history; testing requirements; graduation and record keeping. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and demonstrate a basic knowledge of the issues and challenges in home schooling.

ENGL 111 Written Expression

Description: 

This course is the required first course in a series of two designed to develop the ability to produce clear expository prose. Emphasis is on the writing process including audience analysis, topic selection, thesis support and development, editing, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English.

ENGL 112 Argument-Based Literary Research

Description: 

This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and argumentative strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing data and incorporating research findings into documented argumentative essays and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using standard research format and style.

ENGL 261 World Literature I

Description: 

This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their literary beginnings through the seventeenth century. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works.

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