Courses
The courses offered by the University are listed below in alphabetical order by discipline or field of study, except as otherwise noted, and in numerical order under the discipline or field of study. Following the title of each course are numbers representing lecture, laboratory, clinical experience, and credit respectively, the requirements for admission to the course, if any, and a brief description of its content.

For more information on these course descriptions, see About Course Descriptions.

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is not sufficient enrollment to warrant its offering.


ACCT 251 Principles of Financial Accounting

Description: 

This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is upon on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations.

ACCT 252 Using Accounting Information

Description: 

This course introduces the use of the accounting information to manage, measure, and improve the performance of a business enterprise or nonprofit corporation, and to make decisions about future operations. Emphasis is on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts including product-costing systems.

ANTH 220 Sociocultural Anthropology

Description: 

This course introduces the nature of human culture from a global perspective. Emphasis is on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, religion, and the cultural past to produce a holistic and global perspective of humanity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate enhanced global awareness including an understanding of basic cultural processes and the methodologies involved in the collection and analysis of cultural data.

ANTH 230L Biological Anthropology Laboratory

Description: 

This course provides a laboratory work that reinforces the material presented in ANTH 230. Emphasis is placed on laboratory exercises which may include fossil identification, genetic analysis, skeletal comparisons, forensics, computer simulations, and field observations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of human genetics, non-human primates, the human fossil record, and human variation.

ANTH 420 Globalization and Cultural Anthropology: The Christian Perspective

Description: 

This course explores contemporary issues and concepts in sociocultural anthropology in a diachronic, holistic and global perspective from a Christian worldview. Emphasis is on how the understanding of scripture and international and intercultural ministry activities can be enhanced by cultural understanding. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate enhanced global awareness including an understanding of basic cultural processes and the global context in which people live.

BUS 112 Introduction to Business

Description: 

This course deals with major aspects of business including management, marketing, accounting, information processing and fi nance. Emphasis is on real business personalities and situations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects.

BUS 308 Business Law

Description: 

This course deals with the American legal system, torts, contracts, agency, sales, property, negotiable instruments and business organizations. Special emphasis is on contemporary business ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations.

BUS 350 Organizational Theory and Behavior

Description: 

This course introduces the use of the accounting information to manage, measure, and improve the performance of a business enterprise or nonprofit corporation, and to make decisions about future operations. Emphasis is on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts including product-costing systems.

CIS 110 Introduction to Computers

Prospectus: 
Description: 

This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems.

COMM 150 Oral Communication

Description: 

This course provides a foundation for public speaking, including critical listening and methods of writing, organizing, delivering and critiquing speeches. Emphasis is on effective oral communication through study and experience in analysis, synthesis and presentation of subject matter in oral communication. Upon completion, students should be able to make clear and convincing oral presentations to individuals or groups, clarify information as needed, and facilitate an open exchange of ideas.

COMM 200 Introduction to Mass Communications

Description: 

This course introduces the nature, functions and responsibilities of the communications media; news, opinion, entertainment aspects of communication; analysis of mass media and their social and cultural effects with emphasis on the interaction between audience and media. Topics include the nature, history, functions, and responsibilities of mass communication industries in a global environment and their role and impact in American society. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate awareness of the pervasive nature of mass media and how media operate in an advanced post-industrial society.

COMM 230 Writing for Communications

Description: 

This course focuses on basic news gathering and writing principles Emphasis is on the review of writing principles and fundamentals; identifying elements of news, news values; familiarization with styles used in journalism, broadcasting, advertising, and public relations. Upon completion, students should be able to write clear, concise, accurate, complete, balanced and readable news stories according to guidelines set by industry standards.

COMM 260 Public Speaking

Description: 

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

COMM 265 Advanced Public Speaking

Description: 

This course focuses on the theoretical principles of public speaking and provides advanced practical experience in the preparation, delivery, and evaluation of public discourse. Emphasis is performance-centered and includes presentations, selected readings, examinations and classroom exercises on a more advanced level. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches to a variety of audiences.

COMM 301 Introduction to Public Relations

Description: 

This course deals with public relations, including history, theory and contemporary practice, stressing public relations as a planned effort to influence opinion through ethical character and responsible performance.  Upon completion, students should be able to summarize public relations history, conduct research, develop press releases, create printed material, and formulate a crisis plan.

COMM 304 Desktop Publishing

Description: 

This course introduces students to the principles of design applicable to publications created using desktop publishing software and computer technology. Emphasis is on design principles, typography, layout and production techniques using microcomputer desktop publishing software packages and the principles and ethics of the publishing field. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the various phases of writing and producing desktop publications.

COMM 323 Discussion and Conference Techniques

Description: 

This course considers the theoretical and practical aspects of group functioning. Topics include an introduction to small group theory, problem solving and decision making, team building, group communication facilitation, communication climate, conflict management, and ethics and leadership in group communication. Upon completion, students should be able to  organize, lead, and participate in private and public discussion.

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