Enrollment for the Spring 2018 semester begins on November 13, 2017 and runs through January 9, 2018. If you are planning to be a new student beginning with the spring semester, please submit a completed online Application for Admission to the Admissions Office. Students with admissions questions should contact our admissions office at 704-708-2294. Individuals applying for the Open Learning Program provide minimal information.

An Open Learning student can apply a maximum of twenty-four semester hours earned through the Open Learning Program to a baccalaureate degree, eighteen to an associate degree, and fifteen to a diploma or certificate. Grades earned through the Open Learning Program become part of a student's permanent academic record.

The University seeks to provide a Prospectus for each course so that prospective students have a well-informed idea of the nature and requirements of our courses. A Prospectus, however, is a generalized syllabus. A formal course syllabus is made available for each course when the semester begins. A registered student may drop a course with a 100% refund of tuition if the student officially withdraws (drops) a course prior to the first day of classes of the semester (January 10) or during the Late Registration (Add/Drop) Period as noted in the Academic Calendar.

COMM 265 Advanced Public Speaking

Description: 

This course focuses on the theoretical principles of public speaking and provides advanced practical experience in the preparation, delivery, and evaluation of public discourse. Emphasis is performance-centered and includes presentations, selected readings, examinations and classroom exercises on a more advanced level. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches to a variety of audiences.

THL 110B Tomorrow's World Bible Study Course

Description: 

This two semester course serves as an introduction to the Bible, its message, and its implication for successful Christian living. First semester topics focus on the Scriptures, the nature of God, biblical prophecy and God's plan for humankind. Second semester topics focus on practical Christian living and the building of living faith. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of biblical concepts regarding history, theology, prophecy and Christian life.

THL 136 Acts and the Writings of Paul

Description: 

Focused in the book of Acts of the Apostles this course deals with Paul’s life, times, and writings including the background, purpose, message, and themes of the Pauline epistles; his personal life and character; his companions; and the chronology of the apostle’s life. Emphasis is on the theology of his writings and the issues that Paul dealt with in apostolic times. Upon completion, students should be able to show the message of Acts and each of the Pauline Epistles and their implication and application.

THL 212 Old Testament Survey II

Description: 

This course deals with the Minor Prophets and The Writings. Emphasis is upon the background, content, structure, geography, teachings and basic meaning of each book and outstanding people and events as background and foundation for understanding the New Testament. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the author, background, theme, and content of each book.

THL 320 Introduction to Church History

Description: 

This course traces the history of the Church of God from apostolic times to the present day. Topics include significant events in the life of the Church and its theology through each of its seven distinct eras. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze significant developments in the history and theology of the Church.

THL 345 Christian Men

Description: 

This course deals with Christian men as husbands, fathers and masculine leaders of the family. Topics include the purpose God has given men, being a loving leader and head of a family and key areas in which Christian men are challenged to mature and excel. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate and explain the principles relevant to the life, work, and success of the Christian man.

THL 380 Introduction to Biblical Doctrine

Description: 

This course deals with basic biblical doctrine. Topics include the Church, the Holy Bible, God, the Holy Spirit, the gospel, salvation, holy days and festivals, the law of God, the Sabbath, sin, being born again, church government, marriage, the second coming of Christ, the last judgment, and human potential. Upon completion, students should be able to state and demonstrate fundamental understanding of basic biblical doctrine. Tomorrow’s World television presenter Richard Ames presents a series of lectures on foundational biblical doctrines. 

THL 394 Senior Thesis

Description: 

This is a special course for developing a thesis written on a work (or works) selected in conference with the thesis sponsor. In this course a student selects a thesis topic in consultation with a faculty sponsor before registration and completes it over the course of a semester. Progress meetings are held regularly and the student must submit a formal final approved thesis. Upon completion, the student can demonstrate mastery in the content of the thesis orally and in writing.

THL 413 Epistles of Paul II

Description: 

This is the second course focusing on the Apostle Paul’s life and writings. Emphasis is on the final five of his letters to the seven churches (Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and 1 & 2 Thessalonians), his letter to the church at-large (Hebrews) and his letters addressed to individuals (1 & 2 Timothy, Titus and Philemon). Stress is upon the use of critical, historical, archaeological and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

THL 422 History of Christianity II

Description: 

This course deals with the history of Christianity from the time of the Reformation to the present. Its focus is on the Protestant Reformation, Roman Catholic reform, Protestant liberalism and fundamentalism, the ecumenical movement, Christianity in developing countries, and the Christian decline of the industrialized West. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the modern history of Christianity as a global religion and to show the diversity of its beliefs and practices.

THL 450 Introduction to Biblical Theology

Description: 

This course deals with the principal doctrines of Christianity as seen through various theological systems and interpretations. Topics include the nature of God; biblical and theological development of concepts regarding the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit; the creation and the purpose for mankind; and covenants, salvation, grace, law, faith and the Church. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate systematic approach to fundamental doctrinal understanding. This is the capstone course for the baccalaureate degree theology major.

THL 499abc Independent Study

Description: 

In this course a student selects a project in consultation with a faculty sponsor before registration and completes it over the course of a semester. Progress meetings are held regularly and the student must submit a formal final report. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate mastery in the content of the project orally and in writing.