Fall 2017 Class Schedule

Enrollment for the Fall 2017 semester begins on July 5, 2017 and runs through August 15, 2017. If you are planning to be a new student beginning with the fall semester, please submit a completed online Application for Admission to the Admissions Office. Students with admissions questions should contact our admissions office at 704-708-2294. Individuals applying for the Open Learning Program provide minimal information.

An Open Learning student can apply a maximum of twenty-four semester hours earned through the Open Learning Program to a baccalaureate degree, eighteen to an associate degree, and fifteen to a diploma or certificate. Grades earned through the Open Learning Program become part of a student's permanent academic record.

The University seeks to provide a Prospectus for each course so that prospective students have a well-informed idea of the nature and requirements of our courses. A Prospectus, however, is a generalized syllabus. A formal course syllabus is made available for each course when the semester begins. A registered student may drop a course with a 100% refund of tuition if the student officially withdraws (drops) a course prior to the first day of classes of the semester (August 16) or during the Late Registration (Add/Drop) Period as noted in the Academic Calendar.

ACCT 251 Principles of Financial Accounting

Description: 

This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations.

ANTH 230L Biological Anthropology Laboratory

Description: 

This course provides laboratory work that reinforces the material presented in ANTH 230. Emphasis is on laboratory exercises which may include genetic analysis, fossil identification, skeletal comparisons, forensics, computer simulations, and field observations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the methods, techniques, and procedures used in biological anthropology.

COMM 260 Public Speaking

Description: 

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

EDUC 345 Child Growth and Development

Description: 

This course deals with the influence of Christian family relationships on child development. Emphasis is on basic principles and skills for parent effectiveness, the developing nature and needs of children, and how they learn. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and demonstrate knowledge of major areas of child growth and development and effective Christian parenting.

ENGL 261 World Literature I

Description: 

This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their literary beginnings through the seventeenth century. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works.

HIST 111 History of Western Civilization to 1660

Description: 

This course, the first course in a series of two, deals with Western civilization from pre-history to the late seventeenth century. Emphasis on the ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome, Middle Ages, the Papacy, Renaissance and Reformation, early nation states and the Thirty Years’ War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early Western civilization.

HPRO 114 Health and Wellness

Description: 

This course aims to filter the vast array of health-related knowledge available in the world today through sound biblical principles. Emphasis is placed on lifestyle-related wellness, health promotion, and disease prevention within the context of a range of health topics. Upon completion students should be able to demonstrate a cursory understanding of and basic skill set related to: healthy decision-making, consumer health education, healthy weight management, and other skills which will enable them to make health-enhancing choices and engage in health-enhancing activities to improve their quality of life.

THL 110A Tomorrow's World Bible Study Course

Description: 

This two semester course serves an introduction to the Bible, its message, and its implication for successful Christian living. First semester topics focus on the Scriptures, the nature of God, biblical prophecy and God's plan for humankind. Second semester topics focus on practical Christian living and the building of living faith. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of biblical concepts regarding history, theology, prophecy and Christian life.

THL 135 Life, Ministry and Teachings of Jesus

Description: 

This course covers the life, ministry, and teachings of Jesus Christ as presented in the four gospels. Emphasis is on the analysis of the four gospels in the context of the social, political, and religious conditions of the first century. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the background, purpose, message, and themes of the gospels and the significance of Jesus Christ in the first century and beyond. The lecture core of this course is a series of recorded lectures presented by noted television evangelist, author, and pastor of pastors Dr. Roderick C. Meredith.

THL 200 Principles of Christian Living

Description: 

This covers the purpose for human life; human nature; values, morality, and ethics; marriage and family, and career. Topics include values, beliefs, and mores; interpersonal communication, dating, courtship, marriage, and children. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and demonstrate a basic knowledge of practical Christian living. The lecture core is a set of contemporary lectures by Dr. Douglas Winnail dealing with the foundations of Christian living for successful life in today's world.

THL 211 Old Testament Survey I

Description: 

This course deals with the Law, the Former Prophets and the Major Prophets. Emphasis is upon the background, content, structure, geography, teachings, and basic meaning of each book as well as outstanding people and events as background and foundation for understanding the New Testament. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the author, background, theme and content of each book.

THL 332 The Biblical Text

Description: 

This course deals with the authority, inspiration, canonization, literary unity, and textual criticism of the biblical text. Emphasis is on Bible translations, versions, textual analysis, exegesis, and research. Upon completion, students should be able to generate an evidence-based explanation of the formation of the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament and demonstrate the fundamentals of interpretation and textual research.

THL 342 Christian Marriage and Family

Description: 

This course provides a biblical perspective and an overview of research as it relates to marriage and family relationships. Selected topics include preparation for marriage, qualities for home and family life, the adolescent and young married adult, family management, and contemporary problems in marriage and family life. Upon completion, students should be able to describe biblical principles for marriage and family, to explain examined theories related to marriage and family, to summarize factors involved in mate selection and readiness for marriage, and to articulate principles of establishing and maintaining healthy family relationships.

THL 412 Epistles of Paul I

Description: 

This is the first of two courses focusing on the Apostle Paul’s life and writings. Its emphasis is on the first four of his letters to the seven churches (Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians and Galatians) and includes a study of the background, message, purposes and themes of each. Stress is upon the use of critical, historical, archaeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, and explain these biblical writings.

 

THL 416 General Epistles and Revelation

Description: 

This course introduces the historical setting, purpose, and central theme of the letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude and the book of Revelation. Emphasis is on the use of critical, historical, archaeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use analysis tools to read, understand, explain, and expound on these biblical writings.

THL 421 History of Christianity I

Description: 

This course deals with the history of Christianity from the first century to the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation. Focus is on the growth and development of Christianity during the early centuries in the Mediterranean World as well as its expansion into Europe and the East. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of major events, movements, and theological trends from the first century to the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation.

THL 460 Understanding Contemporary World Religions

Description: 

This course is an introduction to the major religious traditions of the world, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam; and consideration of neo-pagan and cultic phenomena in the contemporary world. Emphasis is on the historical development, key figures, as well as major doctrines and practices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the similarities and differences between the world’s religions and how they differ from Christianity.

THL 499abc Independent Study

Description: 

In this course a student selects a project in consultation with a faculty sponsor before registration and completes it over the course of a semester. Progress meetings are held regularly and the student must submit a formal final report. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate mastery in the content of the project orally and in writing.